Watermelon

All photos © Fadia Jawdat 2017

One of my favorite summer desserts while growing up in Lebanon, was a combination of Watermelon and white cheese, Halloumi in particular. It also worked well as a refreshing afternoon snack when we came back from a day at the beach, parched and sunburned. Each mouthful combined the salt with the sweet, the chewy with the juicy crunchiness, hydrating every cell in our bodies.

Memories rush through my mind’s eye: watermelon mounds by the side of the road where farmers unload their summer crop, or the pushcart vendors shouting “Battikh Aassikkeen” (literally: watermelon on the knife). The vendors would cut open a watermelon for customers to check the saturation of color while they tested its sweetness from the slice that was handed out to them insistingly.

Lately, I have revived an old forgotten recipe for Watermelon Gazpacho. It is so easy once all ingredients are assembled. Try it before summer’s end.  I find this cold “soup” refreshing and nutritious.
It’s a god-send when your rushing about trying to get food on the table for a large group of guests and your kitchen is looking chaotic and your mind has turned to mush. It’s a great way to center yourself, call attention to the fact that dinner is about to be served, give your guests a chance to wrap up their conversations and ready themselves for the meal ahead. Serve and pass it around in shot or martini glasses with a sprig of mint or basil and a wedge of lime. But it’s also great for a quick grab and go lunch. I make a big batch (double the recipe) and keep it in bottles or jars in the refrigerator to take to work or to snack on throughout the week.

Getting Gazpacho ingredients ready…

Watermelon Gazpacho

Ingredients
• 5 cups watermelon, cubed
• 1 cucumber (peeled)
• a couple of green onions chopped or several sprigs of chives
• 1 Beefsteak tomato or favorite heirloom
• 1/4 red onion
• 2 garlic cloves, minced
• 2 tablespoons mild vinegar (I like to use Ume Plum Vinegar for its mildness and saltiness. Do not use salt if you have and use it)
• 1 tablespoons good olive oil (optional)
• 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1 lime, juiced and another sliced for garnish

Both lime and vinegar are the “acids” for this recipe. Let your personal taste buds decide how much of each you’d like. Add them as you go, until desired acidity is achieved. Add salt if needed.

Fresh ground pepper is great but for those who really like spice you can add Jalapeno or a sprinkle of red pepper flakes. Adjust ingredients and flavors to your own taste barometer.

Add all ingredients in a blender, Vitamix or food processor and pulse. Some like it chunky others like it smooth. The decision is yours. Be sure to chill for several hours before serving. You can make this a day ahead. It tends to separate—liquid from solids—nothing that a quick stir won’t fix.

Cheers!

More reading:

  • I inevitably do a little research on a topic I am about to tackle: any interesting information out there worth sharing? There are the usual health benefits listed and the watermelon has many. But I did come across a full description of heirloom varieties in Mother Earth News and history in America, that is worth a read.
  • I also would like to share a story posted by NPR about the Bradford Watermelon, one particular heirloom watermelon making a comeback—not a commercial comeback but an inspirational one (details on the website. It seems to be the sweetest melon of all!
  • And if you are so inclined watch video on female and male watermelon flowers.