Watermelon

All photos © Fadia Jawdat 2017

One of my favorite summer desserts while growing up in Lebanon, was a combination of Watermelon and white cheese, Halloumi in particular. It also worked well as a refreshing afternoon snack when we came back from a day at the beach, parched and sunburned. Each mouthful combined the salt with the sweet, the chewy with the juicy crunchiness, hydrating every cell in our bodies.

Memories rush through my mind’s eye: watermelon mounds by the side of the road where farmers unload their summer crop, or the pushcart vendors shouting “Battikh Aassikkeen” (literally: watermelon on the knife). The vendors would cut open a watermelon for customers to check the saturation of color while they tested its sweetness from the slice that was handed out to them insistingly.

Lately, I have revived an old forgotten recipe for Watermelon Gazpacho. It is so easy once all ingredients are assembled. Try it before summer’s end.  I find this cold “soup” refreshing and nutritious.
It’s a god-send when your rushing about trying to get food on the table for a large group of guests and your kitchen is looking chaotic and your mind has turned to mush. It’s a great way to center yourself, call attention to the fact that dinner is about to be served, give your guests a chance to wrap up their conversations and ready themselves for the meal ahead. Serve and pass it around in shot or martini glasses with a sprig of mint or basil and a wedge of lime. But it’s also great for a quick grab and go lunch. I make a big batch (double the recipe) and keep it in bottles or jars in the refrigerator to take to work or to snack on throughout the week.

Getting Gazpacho ingredients ready…

Watermelon Gazpacho

Ingredients
• 5 cups watermelon, cubed
• 1 cucumber (peeled)
• a couple of green onions chopped or several sprigs of chives
• 1 Beefsteak tomato or favorite heirloom
• 1/4 red onion
• 2 garlic cloves, minced
• 2 tablespoons mild vinegar (I like to use Ume Plum Vinegar for its mildness and saltiness. Do not use salt if you have and use it)
• 1 tablespoons good olive oil (optional)
• 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1 lime, juiced and another sliced for garnish

Both lime and vinegar are the “acids” for this recipe. Let your personal taste buds decide how much of each you’d like. Add them as you go, until desired acidity is achieved. Add salt if needed.

Fresh ground pepper is great but for those who really like spice you can add Jalapeno or a sprinkle of red pepper flakes. Adjust ingredients and flavors to your own taste barometer.

Add all ingredients in a blender, Vitamix or food processor and pulse. Some like it chunky others like it smooth. The decision is yours. Be sure to chill for several hours before serving. You can make this a day ahead. It tends to separate—liquid from solids—nothing that a quick stir won’t fix.

Cheers!

More reading:

  • I inevitably do a little research on a topic I am about to tackle: any interesting information out there worth sharing? There are the usual health benefits listed and the watermelon has many. But I did come across a full description of heirloom varieties in Mother Earth News and history in America, that is worth a read.
  • I also would like to share a story posted by NPR about the Bradford Watermelon, one particular heirloom watermelon making a comeback—not a commercial comeback but an inspirational one (details on the website. It seems to be the sweetest melon of all!
  • And if you are so inclined watch video on female and male watermelon flowers.

Author: slicesofquinceblog

Hello, Thank you for visiting my blog. My name is Fadia. Fadia, like “Nadia” but with an F as in “Food”. Food is a passion of mine, bordering on an obsession. It has kept me sane (and well-nourished) during a long and crazy career in the food business. I live in Washington, D.C. with my husband, where our two daughters were born and raised and where, they learned to spend hours in the kitchen watching, experimenting, learning, cooking and baking. Food has been the thread and fabric of my relationships with people who, like me, have researched its nourishing and healing powers and have shared their knowledge in underserved or “over-served” communities, or who simply are thrilled with the joys of cooking. I grew up in Beirut, Lebanon, in a household and a family of cooks, or should I say, in a country of fiercely competitive cooks (I will probably write about Middle-eastern cooking as adapted to the U.S. kitchen). I moved to New York in my twenties and there I began my life-long exploration of world cuisines while still perfecting the art of cooking elaborate and healthy dishes in a jiffy and on a budget. We never succumbed to frozen dinners— O.K. maybe, a frozen pizza on the occasional Friday night. This is America after all! I cook just about everyday. I have had many teachers and many mentors, and I have taught and mentored many. I am still discovering and learning. It’s a never-ending joyful process. I also cook for distraction and have cooked professionally as instructor and demonstrator. I am setting up a burgeoning business as a freelance recipe tester and developer and a food writer and photographer. (Bring on the requests! I am available for hire). In this blog I plan to share photos, recipes and stories. Most of all I would like to honor all my kitchen heroes who have and continue to inspire me. I would like it to develop into a forum of exchange between friends, a resource for tips, information and ideas. Finally, I must mention that I do not do this without a twang of shame. I‘ll mention it and move on, hoping that perhaps later, I could dedicate more time and writing to it. The dark side of food, is the lack of it, bringing on malnutrition, disease and hunger to billions around the globe and right here in our own backyards. Our culture has also contributed to devastating food disorders that are very hard to ignore. As much as food brings us joy, the lack of it brings devastation. I never forget that. I would like to think that while we relish our beautiful dishes and our gorgeous photos of elegantly plated food, we can take a moment to read a HUNGER blog or two and help the people and organizations that dedicate their lives to this universal cause. Each of us food fanatics can. Please start now, start thoughtfully . I know I shall. With gratitude. F.

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