Top 5 Tips for Kitchen Survival

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Bunches of rainbow chard, need washing and chopping. I cook the stems separately with chopped onions and crushed garlic to make a nutritious and colorful garnish. Photos © Fadia Jawdat 2016

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#1: Dedicate one shopping/prepping day/week
I don’t care how insane this might seem, but my number one advice to anyone trying to eat a healthy diet is to dedicate one shopping day a week, followed by some “prepping” time. Even if you are single, you can save a lot of money by making your own meals at home and packing a daily lunch for the office. This works particularly well if you have a pretty predictable routine. If you’re traveling off and on, are the adventurous type and do not have a predictable work week, then this is not for you. But if you have a family to come home to after a full-days work, or if you are super conscious about your nutritional intake, then read on.

The biggest life-saving practice for me was to spend one day in the kitchen, prepping, peeling, washing, drying, blanching, sautéing, and storing. The rest of the week would seem like a breeze once I had cooked veggies, juiced lemons, peeled garlic and portioned sauces, and had them ready, right there at my finger tips. For the greater part of my adult life, I shopped for my  family’s weekly needs, then came home to spend the rest of the day in the kitchen. I had a planned weekly menu—nothing fancy, just well-rounded and balanced with enough variety not to bore the adventurous but also homey enough to be comforting. I would allow room for a couple of nights of recycled leftovers, and perhaps the occasional frozen pizza night with salad. Sundays seemed best for this practice, when dad took the kids to play-dates while I cooked up a storm.

My daughters were in no way banished from the kitchen. On the contrary, when they crawled, they had their designated lower drawers to open and explore, when they sat in their high chairs they had wooden spoons and plastic bowls to play with. When they were coordinated enough to sit at the high island counter across from me, they made their own sandwiches, learned to make their own salads and dressings, mixed batter, greased baking sheets and shared and enjoyed in the experience.

Chopping and freezing herbs, apportioning sauces, pesto and other ingredients are basic practices that help turn even the most elaborate dishes into a breeze. Here are a few to be followed by a few others next week.

#2: Peel entire heads of garlic at a time
I use at least a clove a day for my salad dressing and another few for sautéed mushrooms, soups, stews, roasts, marinades. A jar of peeled garlic in the fridge is very handy for “grab-and-use without switching gears.
Peeling garlic is my least favorite activity. If you peel a clove at a time, it’s an ordeal. Buy yourself one of those rubbery hollow cylinders to make your life a lot easier, and give it a go. Simply insert 4-6 cloves in the cavity, roll the cylinder on the counter while applying a little pressure, and voila! It’s done. Cloves as clean as a whistle. (Still, you need to clean off the mess on your counter and rinse out your peeler).

#3:  Chop and freeze parsley
Frozen parsley does  not seem to retain much flavor, but for garnishing dishes at the last-minute, or for a touch of green and a shot of potassium and anti-oxidants in a chicken soup, or a bowl of noodles, a sprinkling of frozen chopped parsley is visually and nutritionally miraculous.

#4: Freeze Ginger Root and Lemons
Place in Ziplock bags and freeze. I have been freezing ginger for years. Lemon, frozen whole, is a new-comer to my freezer. This practice makes the grating with a micro-plane less tedious.

#5: Freeze Tomato Paste
I buy tomato paste in cans, rarely in tubes. I only use a teaspoon or tablespoon at a time. Scoop out the paste into a ziploc bag and flatten out while evenly spreading the content to all sides of the bag. Seal and freeze. Once frozen, it is so easy to break off a piece to add to your pot.

As the children grew older, our habits changed and so did our palate. My cooking adventure grew and grew and my cooking repertoire expanded. But those basic tips mentioned here remain invaluable. When the kids come back and delve into their own recipes, my freezer is still filled with frozen essentials for them to use at a moment’s notice.

My freezer and I are always ready for the occasional snow day and the impromptu guests’ or daughters’ visits.

Author: slicesofquinceblog

Hello, Thank you for visiting my blog. My name is Fadia. Fadia, like “Nadia” but with an F as in “Food”. Food is a passion of mine, bordering on an obsession. It has kept me sane (and well-nourished) during a long and crazy career in the food business. I live in Washington, D.C. with my husband, where our two daughters were born and raised and where, they learned to spend hours in the kitchen watching, experimenting, learning, cooking and baking. Food has been the thread and fabric of my relationships with people who, like me, have researched its nourishing and healing powers and have shared their knowledge in underserved or “over-served” communities, or who simply are thrilled with the joys of cooking. I grew up in Beirut, Lebanon, in a household and a family of cooks, or should I say, in a country of fiercely competitive cooks (I will probably write about Middle-eastern cooking as adapted to the U.S. kitchen). I moved to New York in my twenties and there I began my life-long exploration of world cuisines while still perfecting the art of cooking elaborate and healthy dishes in a jiffy and on a budget. We never succumbed to frozen dinners— O.K. maybe, a frozen pizza on the occasional Friday night. This is America after all! I cook just about everyday. I have had many teachers and many mentors, and I have taught and mentored many. I am still discovering and learning. It’s a never-ending joyful process. I also cook for distraction and have cooked professionally as instructor and demonstrator. I am setting up a burgeoning business as a freelance recipe tester and developer and a food writer and photographer. (Bring on the requests! I am available for hire). In this blog I plan to share photos, recipes and stories. Most of all I would like to honor all my kitchen heroes who have and continue to inspire me. I would like it to develop into a forum of exchange between friends, a resource for tips, information and ideas. Finally, I must mention that I do not do this without a twang of shame. I‘ll mention it and move on, hoping that perhaps later, I could dedicate more time and writing to it. The dark side of food, is the lack of it, bringing on malnutrition, disease and hunger to billions around the globe and right here in our own backyards. Our culture has also contributed to devastating food disorders that are very hard to ignore. As much as food brings us joy, the lack of it brings devastation. I never forget that. I would like to think that while we relish our beautiful dishes and our gorgeous photos of elegantly plated food, we can take a moment to read a HUNGER blog or two and help the people and organizations that dedicate their lives to this universal cause. Each of us food fanatics can. Please start now, start thoughtfully . I know I shall. With gratitude. F.

2 thoughts on “Top 5 Tips for Kitchen Survival”

  1. Great tips. If you freeze a lemon that makes it easier to make the zest, but then you cannot get the lemon juice afterwards, or can you, once it thaws? I love the tomato paste tip!

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    1. Laila, the answer to your question was to be for next week’s post. I wrote that freezing the whole lemon was new to me. I know it works for grating zest. One long-time practice of mine has been to juice the lemons and pour into ice cube trays to freeze and use one ice-cube at a time. I’ll try to follow up with more details next week. Cheers and thanks for reading my posts!

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